Christ Our Passover – Pg3

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II. HOW WE DERIVE BENEFIT FROM THE BLOOD OF CHRIST. Christ our Passover is slain for us. The Jew could not say that; he could say, a lamb, but “the Lamb,” even “Christ our Passover,” was not yet become a victim. And here are some of my hearers within these walls to-night who cannot say “Christ our Passover is slain for us.” But glory be to God! some of us can. There are not a few here who have laid their hands upon the glorious Scapegoat; and now they can put their hands upon the Lamb also, and they can say, “Yes; it is true, he is not only slain, but Christ our Passover is slain for us.” We derive benefit from the death of Christ in two modes: first, by having his blood sprinkled on us for our redemption; secondly, by our eating his flesh for food, regeneration and sanctification. The first aspect in which a sinner views Jesus is that of a lamb slain, whose blood is sprinkled on the door-post and on the lintel. Note the fact, that the blood was never sprinkled on the threshold. It was sprinkled on the lintel, the top of the door, on the side-post, but never on the threshold, for woe unto him who trampleth under foot the blood of the Son of God! Even the priest of Dagon trod not on the threshold of his god, much less will the Christian trample under foot the blood of the Paschal Lamb. But his blood must be on our right hand to be our constant guard, and on our left to be our continual support. We want to have Jesus Christ sprinkled on us. As I told you before, it is not alone the blood of Christ poured out on Calvary that saves a sinner; it is the blood of Christ sprinkled on the heart. Let us turn to the land of Zoan. Do you not think you behold the scene to-night! It is evening. The Egyptians are going homeward—little thinking of what is coming. But just as soon as the sun is set, a lamb is brought into every house. The Egyptian strangers passing by, say, “These Hebrews are about to keep a feast to night,” and they retire to their houses utterly careless about it. The father of the Hebrew house takes his lamb, and examining it once more with anxious curiosity, looks it over from head to foot, to see if it has a blemish. He findeth none. “My son,” he says to one of them, “bring hither the bason.” It is held. He stabs the lamb, and the blood flows into the bason. Do you not think you see the sire, as he commands his matronly wife to roast the lamb before the fire! “Take heed,” he says, “that not a bone be broken.” Do you see her intense anxiety, as she puts it down to roast, lest a bone should be broken? Now, says the father, “bring a bunch of hyssop.” A child brings it. The father dips it into the blood. “Come here, my children, wife and all, and see what I am about to do.” He takes the hyssop in his hands, dips it in the blood, and sprinkles it across the lintel and the door-post. His children say, “What mean you by this ordinance?” He answers, “This night the Lord God will pass through to smite the Egyptians, and when he seeth the blood upon the lintel and on the two side posts, the Lord will pass over the door, and will not suffer the destroyer to come into your houses to smite you.” The thing is done; the lamb is cooked; the guests are set down to it; the father of the family has supplicated a blessing; they are sitting down to feast upon it. And mark how the old man carefully divides joint from joint, lest a bone should be broken; and he is particular that the smallest child of the family should have some of it to eat, for so the Lord hath commanded. Do you not think you see him as he tells them “it is a solemn night—make haste—in another hour we shall all go out of Egypt.” He looks at his hands, they are rough with labour, and clapping them, he cries, “I am not to be a slave any longer.” His eldest son, perhaps, has been smarting under the lash, and he says, “Son, you have had the task-master’s lash upon you this afternoon; but it is the last time you shall feel it.” He looks at them all, with tears in his eyes—”This is the night the Lord God will deliver you.” Do you see them with their hats on their heads, with their loins girt, and their staves in their hands? It is the dead of the night. Suddenly they hear a shriek! The father says, “Keep within doors, my children; you will know what it is in a moment.” Now another shriek—another shriek—shriek succeeds shriek: they hear perpetual wailing and lamentation. “Remain within,” says he, “the angel of death is flying abroad.” A solemn silence is in the room, and they can almost hear the wings of the angel flap in the air as he passes their blood-marked door. “Be calm,” says the sire, “that blood will save you.” The shrieking increases. “Eat quickly, my children,” he says again, and in a moment the Egyptians coming, say, “Get thee hence! Get thee hence! We are not for the jewels that you have borrowed. You have brought death into our houses.” “Oh!” says a mother, “Go! for God’s sake! go. My eldest son lies dead!” “Go!” says a father, “Go! and peace go with you. It were an ill day when your people came into Egypt, and our king began to slay your first-born, for God is punishing us for our cruelty.” Ah! see them leaving the land; the shrieks are still heard; the people are busy about their dead. As they go out, a son of Pharoah is taken away unembalmed, to be buried in one of the pyramids. Presently they see one of their task-master’s sons taken away. A happy night for them—when they escape! And do you see, my hearers, a glorious parallel? They had to sprinkle the blood, and also to eat the lamb. Ah! my soul, hast thou e’er had the blood sprinkled on thee? Canst thou say that Jesus Christ is thine? It is not enough to say “he loved the world, and gave his Son,” you must say, “He loved me,, and gave himself for me.” There is another hour coming, dear friends, when we shall all stand before God’s bar; and then God will say, “Angel of death, thou once didst smite Egypt’s first born; thou knowest thy prey. Unsheath thy sword.” I behold the great gathering, you and I are standing amongst them. It is a solemn moment. All men stand in suspense. There is neither hum nor murmur. The very stars cease to shine lest the light should disturb the air by its motion. All is still. God says, “Has thou sealed those that are mine?” “I have,” says Gabriel; “they are sealed by blood every one of them.” Then saith he next, “Sweep with thy sword of slaughter! Sweep the Earth! and send the unclothed, the unpurchased, the unwashed ones to the pit.” Oh! how shall we feel beloved, when for a moment we see that angel flap his wings? He is just about to fly, “But,” will the doubt cross our minds “perhaps he will come to me?” Oh! no; we shall stand and look the angel full in his face.

“Bold shall I stand in that great day!
For who aught to my charge shall lay?
While through thy blood absolved
I am From sin’s tremendous curse and shame.”

If we have the blood on us, we shall see the angel coming, we shall smile at him; we shall dare to come even to God’s face and say,

“Great God! I’m clean! Through Jesus’ blood, I’m clean!”

But if, my hearer, thine unwashen spirit shall stand unshriven before its maker, if thy guilty soul shall appear with all its black spots upon it, unsprinkled with the purple tide, how wilt thou speak when thou seest flash from the scabbard the angel’s sword swift for death, and winged for destruction, and when it shall cleave thee asunder? Methinks I see thee standing now. The angel is sweeping away a thousand there. There is one of thy pot companions. There one with whom thou didst dance and swear. There another, who after attending the same chapel like thee, was a despiser of religion. Now death comes nearer to thee. Just as when the reaper sweeps the field and the next ear trembles because its turn shall come next, I see a brother and a sister swept into the pit. Have I no blood upon me? Then, O rocks! it were kind of you to hide me. Ye have no benevolence in your arms. Mountains! let me find in your caverns some little shelter. But it is all in vain, for vengeance shall cleave the mountains and split the rocks open to find me out. Have I no blood? Have I no hope? Ah! no! he smites me. Eternal damnation is my horrible portion. The depth of the darkness of Egypt for thee, and the horrible torments of the pit from which none can escape! Ah! my dear hearers, could I preach as I could wish, could I speak to you without my lips and with my heart, then would I bid you seek that sprinkled blood, and urge you by the love of your own soul, by everything that is sacred and eternal, to labour to get this blood of Jesus sprinkled on your souls. It is the blood sprinkled that saves a sinner.

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